A Tiger or a Bear?

I am very pleased that this Buddleia has recovered after freezing back completely last winter, but was then doubly happy to see these two butterflies resting on it the other day, as they are quite unusual…

The English name is Jersey Tiger, but in German they are called ‘Russian Bear’… interesting! Another name used in both languages is ‘Spanish Flag’. I wonder what the Spanish call it!

When resting you cannot see the bright orange part of the wings, so here is a Wikipedia photo to give you an idea of the flashes of bright orange when they flutter away – too quickly for me and my camera!

Wilipedia image

In southern Germany they can often be seen, but only near the woods or on shrubby grassland. They apparently like raspberry or nettle leaves, both of which are abundant in the nearby woods and hedges.

Have you seen this butterfly? And which name would you say is more apt – Tiger or Bear?! 😉

In a Vase on Monday: Summer

I am joining Cathy at Rambling in the Garden again, along with many others from around the world, for her Monday vase meme.

Looking around my garden yesterday I realised there are so many lovely wild things growing (i.e. weeds!) so I have also incorporated a few into my vase.

As you can see, the sun is very bright in July, making it difficult to capture the airy vase as a whole, but at least we have had lower temperatures for several days now before the next wave of heat rolls in tomorrow.

On the left is a small stem of Thalictrum ‘Elin’ – such a beauty – with Perovskia and Fleabane.

In the middle are some grasses (Melica and Sporobolus), a poppy seed head, an Allium and some purple spikes of Teucrium.

The white flower is a wild Queen Ann’s Lace.

I think it really does look like lace, don’t you? One of the nicer common names given to pretty plants. 😉

One stem of Calamagrostis and a wild white flower were added…

And of course, I had to use some of my red Queen Ann’s Lace too! (With some wild Achillea in the background).

Why not visit Cathy now and see the lovely pink arrangement she has posted today.

Have a great week!

The Tuesday View: 4th July 2017

It is a warm and muggy Tuesday as I take my photos for my weekly look at the south-west rockery.

The ants have just flown and the sun keeps disappearing behind threatening clouds, but it remains dry. The garden has benefitted enormously from showers over the past five or six days, and the red Lychnis continues to provide splashes of colour.

The lavender is at its peak and the golden rod is standing tall, regardless of rain or drought, sun or wind.

The Perovskia on this side of the rockery will be opening soon, as will the Achillea in the round plant support in the foreground… it is just starting to show some yellow.

Here is the same view when the sun disappeared behind another cloud!

I look forward to seeing other Tuesday views this week. Do join me if you can!

The Tuesday View: 16th May 2017

It’s hot! A few summery days lie ahead of us before the next thunderstorms are forecast, and I shall make the most of the time I have available to do some weeding and cut back a few things. As you can see in today’s view, everything is growing like mad and getting greener and greener!

I think some of that Lysimachia needs to come out before the clematis obelisk on the left gets swallowed up! (The bell has almost disappeared already!)

The acer is the star this week. It is a lovely fresh pale green at this time of year…

And if we look through it we can see the first of the irises…

And look, a peony has opened! It looks a bit like how I felt this lunchtime in the hot sun though!

The lovely aquilegia below (‘Rose Queen’) is actually not quite within the Tuesday view, but it is one of the first to open. The others are almost all mixes that have spread around over the years and are only just starting to bloom. They seem taller than ever this year!

If you have a view of your garden that would like to focus on and share through the seasons, please join me and my fellow Tuesday View crowd and leave a link below in the comments.

Happy May!

Finding a Niche

There are several plants in and around my garden that pop up in different places each year. Our top compost heap is home to nettles and Jack-in-the-Hedge (Alliaria) this year. While the beech hedge on the north side of the house has offered cover for Greater Celandine. The ants, birds and puffs of wind help them find a new niche to thrive. Sometimes in the most inconvenient of places, but we are flexible here!

The Cymbalaria muralis, for example, has moved up a few steps this spring…

Along with the Aubretia…

Corydalis lutea started out as a single plant in my front bed and now appears in both familiar and new spots, making use of nooks and crannies…

Another pleasing sight is the little violas that have seeded themselves from a single (purple) plant all the way down our garden path…

They are accompanied by violets and a few other weeds…

… as well as wild strawberries…

Then there are those unwanted ones too, of course… but beggars can’t be choosers…

And finally, the Nigella have returned. I wonder what colours will appear this year… 🙂

Do you have any colonizers in your garden?

🙃

 

In a Vase on Monday: The Sun and the Moon

With abundant spring sunshine and a full moon tonight, yellow and white are the colours I chose to put in a vase today, as I join Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for her weekly meme.

When I look at the night sky I love to think that some of you – hundreds of miles away – may be looking at that same sky or moon. And a connection is there…

I also chose a round vase to echo my thoughts… the sun, moon and the globe itself.

My yellow Hellebore ‘Frühlingssonne’ (Spring Sunshine) really took off this year, after just two winters in the garden. It is fading now, but I like it at this stage best as the heads turn slightly upwards and can be seen better.

The vase contains a mix of various Narcissi, including the lovely creamy multiple flower ‘Cheerfulness’, and below you can also see a little white Pulmonaria in the foreground; the label is long gone, but it could be either ‘Sissinghurst White’  or – perhaps more appropriately – ‘Mrs Moon’.

😀

My cowslips have lovely tall stems this year, so are ideal for picking, and I also cut just one of these lovely yellow double tulips.

Other flowers and foliage included are Mahonia, some early summer snowflakes (Leucojum aestivum ‘Gravetye Giant’ – see below), Golden Euonymus, and some starry white Omphalodes verna ‘Alba’.

 I look forward to finding out what is in other Monday vases around the world later today.

And if it is a clear sky for you tonight, do take a glance up at the full moon and perhaps you will understand what I mean…

🌝