A Late Early Spring

Look!

My first tulip ‘Early Harvest’ is out! These, unlike most other tulips, flower extremely early, long before the rest of the garden has had a chance to wake up. They are, however, 10-14 days later than usual this year. The contrast of the bright orange against the brown soil is uplifting to say the least!

I have also got another early tulip already showing… can’t remember what it is, but perhaps it will come to me when it opens fully.

As usual, things are moving along rapidly now that the hard frosts have given way to some mild damp weather, and early spring means the bees are HUNGRY… this little fella couldn’t wait for the bud of the Chionodoxa (‘Glory of the Snow’) to open, and just scrabbled around until he managed to open it himself!

The crocuses have also been attracting the bees…

These splashes of colour are so welcome, and I hope they brighten your day too!

Enjoy the Easter weekend, and hope you get SUNSHINE! 😀

Snow fleas? Pull the other one!

(If you don’t like tiny creepy crawlies, I suggest you go and look at a different post!)

On our walks in the woods recently we have once again noticed little black specks on the snow. Until now we thought it must be dirt from the machinery used for forestry or from old tractors driving through the woods, but this year it was extreme and so we took a closer look…

Here we saw that where tracks are (from tractor tyres, deer, our footprints, skis etc) there is more of this ‘dirt’. Could it be soot? Is our air so bad? Here, in the middle of nowhere, with no industry for miles…

When we got home my Man of Many Talents googled for ages, trying to find something about it, and when he showed me what he had found I was AMAZED! He went back to get more photos so we could check the facts!

Look…

Now I’m going to get even closer…

They are SNOW FLEAS! Now, maybe we are the only people in the world who have never heard of snow fleas before, so I hope I am not showing my ignorance, but aren’t they simply incredible? Here are several hundred or even thousands of them gathering in the hollows of tracks.

Now a little information that we found in German, summarized:

Snow fleas come out of the ground in February/March when the temperature is just above freezing. They are often thought to be soot, as they cover the snow quite thickly in places. But these ‘specks of dirt’ are all the same size (around 1 millimetre long). They can crawl and jump (about 10cm high). However, they aren’t actually fleas, but springtails, so Wikipedia says they are technically not insects.

They emerge at temperatures of about -3°C, and live on fungi, pollen or algae which provide them with a special protein that functions as a kind of antifreeze. They prefer damp forests with evergreens. It is a real migration at this time of year, as they use the snow to move more easily and to search for food and for new ground where they can increase their population.

For scientific purposes my Man of Many Talents let some crawl across his hand, and we think they are actually smaller than 1 millimetre…

So, please let me know if you have ever encountered these fascinating little creatures and any extra information would be very welcome!

😀

Interesting links:

German:

http://www.flora-x.de/schneefloh%20ceratophysella.html

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schneefloh

English:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springtail

https://www.bioethics.ac.uk/news/-snow-flea-antifreeze-protein–could-help-improve-organ-preservation.php

 

The Tuesday View: 26th September 2017

Autumn is my favourite time of year, and this September we are getting plenty of mild sunny days where the garden can be appreciated to the full. I have been focusing on this one view in my garden this year, and I am still noticing things I hadn’t seen before. It has been a wonderful exercise and will be a useful record for future reference.

The Acer is beginning to look really good, framing my Tuesday View on two sides: looking down, slightly to the left…

And looking across from the pathway that goes down behind the Acer…

Looking down to the right the Acer can be seen in the full, with the wonderful Helianthus still flowering like mad…

Aster ‘Lutetia’ is dead centre. Here it is a bit closer up with Hypericum behind it…

Looking back up from the lawn below you can see the Golden Rod on the left, now almost over…

These sedums have been smothered in butterflies when the sun has shone…

And the tall pink Aster ‘Alma Poetschke’ at the bottom of the rockery is just starting to open – nice and early this year…

I managed to catch some of the evening light in the Acer yesterday evening…

I can’t believe it will be October when I post my next view! What is looking good in your garden this September?

Have a good week, and Happy Gardening!

A Tiger or a Bear?

I am very pleased that this Buddleia has recovered after freezing back completely last winter, but was then doubly happy to see these two butterflies resting on it the other day, as they are quite unusual…

The English name is Jersey Tiger, but in German they are called ‘Russian Bear’… interesting! Another name used in both languages is ‘Spanish Flag’. I wonder what the Spanish call it!

When resting you cannot see the bright orange part of the wings, so here is a Wikipedia photo to give you an idea of the flashes of bright orange when they flutter away – too quickly for me and my camera!

Wilipedia image

In southern Germany they can often be seen, but only near the woods or on shrubby grassland. They apparently like raspberry or nettle leaves, both of which are abundant in the nearby woods and hedges.

Have you seen this butterfly? And which name would you say is more apt – Tiger or Bear?! 😉

In a Vase on Monday: Spot the Difference!

I am joining Cathy at Rambling in the Garden once again by gathering materials from my garden for a vase, in order to share them with you all.

I’m afraid the pink rose in the background was trying to grab all the attention while I took the photos!

Can you see what the difference is in the next picture?

The dwarf Buddleia is doing a fine job of attracting the butterflies, mostly Peacocks, but also this Silver-washed fritillary…

It is hot, humid and windy here, and heavy showers have flattened some of my grasses, so I picked a big bunch of these (Sporobolus?), stuck in a stray Buddleia stem, and a Melica ciliata that was swaying over the pathway, and framed it all with some rather healthy looking Hellebore foliage. (Wish it looked that good in winter!)

At the front I added a reddish pink Daucus carota ‘Dara’ flower.

Everything was placed in a flower frog in a new vase, which I picked up on a whim on a brief trip to the florist this morning. I love the colour and the glaze, as well as the shape. 🙂

 

Daucus carota ‘Dara’, grown from seed this spring – it’s a slow germinator, but worth the wait!

Having just looked at Cathy’s own lovely vase today I think we must have been on a similar wavelength as the shape of our vases is very similar. Do go and visit her and see what beautiful arrangements are being created around the world for her meme this Monday!