The Tuesday View: 26th September 2017

Autumn is my favourite time of year, and this September we are getting plenty of mild sunny days where the garden can be appreciated to the full. I have been focusing on this one view in my garden this year, and I am still noticing things I hadn’t seen before. It has been a wonderful exercise and will be a useful record for future reference.

The Acer is beginning to look really good, framing my Tuesday View on two sides: looking down, slightly to the left…

And looking across from the pathway that goes down behind the Acer…

Looking down to the right the Acer can be seen in the full, with the wonderful Helianthus still flowering like mad…

Aster ‘Lutetia’ is dead centre. Here it is a bit closer up with Hypericum behind it…

Looking back up from the lawn below you can see the Golden Rod on the left, now almost over…

These sedums have been smothered in butterflies when the sun has shone…

And the tall pink Aster ‘Alma Poetschke’ at the bottom of the rockery is just starting to open – nice and early this year…

I managed to catch some of the evening light in the Acer yesterday evening…

I can’t believe it will be October when I post my next view! What is looking good in your garden this September?

Have a good week, and Happy Gardening!

The Tuesday View: 19th September 2017

Yesterday was my sixth blogiversary, and I only noticed it after I had posted my vase, so I will put a note on the calendar for next year to remind me and will bake a cake to celebrate!

(Any excuse to bake a cake! 😉 )

I am not sure where those six years have gone, but then I think of how long we have lived here (12 years) and wonder again at how quickly time has flown.

Today time flew as well, and it was late afternoon by the time I got to photograph my view. Autumn shades of burnt orange, copper and golden yellow are beginning to colour the countryside here, and the garden is also looking very autumnal. The acer is gaining colour daily and every morning when I raise the blinds it makes me smile in the knowledge that it will just get better and better until mid October!

Looking down to the right, where the acer stands, the Helianthus and Sedums are a joy to see, but the rose, yellow Achillea, flowering mint and Teucrium are also providing interest in the upper part of this side of the rockery.

The early asters (Aster pyrenaeus ‘Lutetia’) are at their best now, even before the rest have begun to open. They are a very robust sort, and love this dry sunny spot in our chalky soil here.

You can see the new fresh foliage of even more Teucrium hircanicum in front of the aster… it is beginning to take over, and will be drastically reduced in winter again to keep it in check.

In the next picture, looking across from the path to the left, the grasses appear much nearer than they really are. The Perovskia is no longer so vivid, but still lovely.

If you would like to share a view of your garden as the seasons now shift, please do! And leave a link in the comments below. Thanks to those who are still joining me and posting Tuesday views! I will be winding down to a fortnightly view next month after the acer has peaked, but hope to keep it up until winter.

Happy gardening!

The Tuesday View: 12th September 2017

The sun came out this afternon after a damp morning, so I was glad I had waited in hope and could take some photos of the Tuesday view in bright sunshine with raindrops glistening everywhere.

The shot above was actually taken whilst balancing on the rock I place my birdbath on, with the pink rose at my feet producing more buds again. If I zoom in we can see the Aster more clearly with the Hypericum and Helianthus behind it.

The next photo is a few steps further to the right, looking down towards the giant Miscanthus at the bottom of the rockery…

Now I have taken a few steps back and am looking towards the pathway that goes down the side of the garden. You can see what a tangle the lovely Clematis tangutica becomes on this large-but-not-large-enough obelisk. I can also detect noticeable brownish-orange tinges to the Acer.

And as we walk down the path and look left, between the Clematis and the Acer we can see my beloved dwarf Miscanthus ‘Adagio’ in front of the giant Miscanthus. Teucrium, Sedum, Perovskia and yellow Potentilla complete the picture.

I wonder what pleasures your garden is bringing as the seasons change. If you would like to join me in posting a view of one part of your garden each week, just leave a link below in the comments so that we can find you.

🙂

Have a lovely week!

 

A Tiger or a Bear?

I am very pleased that this Buddleia has recovered after freezing back completely last winter, but was then doubly happy to see these two butterflies resting on it the other day, as they are quite unusual…

The English name is Jersey Tiger, but in German they are called ‘Russian Bear’… interesting! Another name used in both languages is ‘Spanish Flag’. I wonder what the Spanish call it!

When resting you cannot see the bright orange part of the wings, so here is a Wikipedia photo to give you an idea of the flashes of bright orange when they flutter away – too quickly for me and my camera!

Wilipedia image

In southern Germany they can often be seen, but only near the woods or on shrubby grassland. They apparently like raspberry or nettle leaves, both of which are abundant in the nearby woods and hedges.

Have you seen this butterfly? And which name would you say is more apt – Tiger or Bear?! 😉

In a Vase on Monday: Summer

I am joining Cathy at Rambling in the Garden again, along with many others from around the world, for her Monday vase meme.

Looking around my garden yesterday I realised there are so many lovely wild things growing (i.e. weeds!) so I have also incorporated a few into my vase.

As you can see, the sun is very bright in July, making it difficult to capture the airy vase as a whole, but at least we have had lower temperatures for several days now before the next wave of heat rolls in tomorrow.

On the left is a small stem of Thalictrum ‘Elin’ – such a beauty – with Perovskia and Fleabane.

In the middle are some grasses (Melica and Sporobolus), a poppy seed head, an Allium and some purple spikes of Teucrium.

The white flower is a wild Queen Ann’s Lace.

I think it really does look like lace, don’t you? One of the nicer common names given to pretty plants. 😉

One stem of Calamagrostis and a wild white flower were added…

And of course, I had to use some of my red Queen Ann’s Lace too! (With some wild Achillea in the background).

Why not visit Cathy now and see the lovely pink arrangement she has posted today.

Have a great week!

The Tuesday View: 4th July 2017

It is a warm and muggy Tuesday as I take my photos for my weekly look at the south-west rockery.

The ants have just flown and the sun keeps disappearing behind threatening clouds, but it remains dry. The garden has benefitted enormously from showers over the past five or six days, and the red Lychnis continues to provide splashes of colour.

The lavender is at its peak and the golden rod is standing tall, regardless of rain or drought, sun or wind.

The Perovskia on this side of the rockery will be opening soon, as will the Achillea in the round plant support in the foreground… it is just starting to show some yellow.

Here is the same view when the sun disappeared behind another cloud!

I look forward to seeing other Tuesday views this week. Do join me if you can!