In a Vase on Monday: The Sun and the Moon

With abundant spring sunshine and a full moon tonight, yellow and white are the colours I chose to put in a vase today, as I join Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for her weekly meme.

When I look at the night sky I love to think that some of you – hundreds of miles away – may be looking at that same sky or moon. And a connection is there…

I also chose a round vase to echo my thoughts… the sun, moon and the globe itself.

My yellow Hellebore ‘Frühlingssonne’ (Spring Sunshine) really took off this year, after just two winters in the garden. It is fading now, but I like it at this stage best as the heads turn slightly upwards and can be seen better.

The vase contains a mix of various Narcissi, including the lovely creamy multiple flower ‘Cheerfulness’, and below you can also see a little white Pulmonaria in the foreground; the label is long gone, but it could be either ‘Sissinghurst White’  or – perhaps more appropriately – ‘Mrs Moon’.

😀

My cowslips have lovely tall stems this year, so are ideal for picking, and I also cut just one of these lovely yellow double tulips.

Other flowers and foliage included are Mahonia, some early summer snowflakes (Leucojum aestivum ‘Gravetye Giant’ – see below), Golden Euonymus, and some starry white Omphalodes verna ‘Alba’.

 I look forward to finding out what is in other Monday vases around the world later today.

And if it is a clear sky for you tonight, do take a glance up at the full moon and perhaps you will understand what I mean…

🌝

In a Vase on Monday: Happy Spring!

Before I present my vase for the weekly Rambling in the Garden meme, I would like to congratulate our host Cathy on her five year blogging anniversary! With “In a Vase on Monday” Cathy has inspired so many to go out into their gardens each week to find materials for a vase to share. Not only that, her regular and cheerful posts about her garden, along with her poems, are such a pleasure to read. So thanks Cathy, and here’s to the next five years!

To mark the first day of astronomical Spring my vase this week was photographed at the exact time of the March equinox – 11.28 a.m. I didn’t actually notice the sun crossing the celestial equator, as it had gone behind a cloud (and seems to have stayed there 😉 ) but I did then inspect the garden to find the first Narcissi opening, along with the first tulips “Early Harvest”. Bang on time! Here is one of those precious tulips, together with some Forsythia that came out today after being indoors for a few days.

I brought out my Forsythia vase, which sadly doesn’t get used very often, although it is always on display on my sideboard.

This is the cusp of Early Spring – in phenology Early Spring starts when the Forsythia opens and the Narcissi are in full bloom. Full Spring will be when the fruit trees start to blossom and the lilac is in flower. So we have plenty more of the season to come.

Happy Spring to all in the northern hemisphere, and to those in the south a very Happy Autumnal Equinox!

😀

Freeze-Froze-Frozen

One of the major inland waterways for freight carried across Germany, the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal, is currently closed to traffic…

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It has been below freezing point for several weeks now (apart from a couple of days around Christmas), at times reaching -17°C and frequently staying at around -9°C during the day. I have seen the canal freeze over once before, but it never freezes completely, being built into the bed of a slow-flowing river. Last Monday it was officially closed to traffic, as the locks froze up and no ice breakers could get through.

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The canal links up the North Sea (Rotterdam in the Netherlands) with the Black Sea, and millions of tonnes of heavy building materials, grain and coal are transported via this route on long deep barges each year. Passenger cruises also regularly use this route, the most popular trips being from Rotterdam or Nurenberg, down past us to the Danube, and then on to Vienna and even Budapest. This part of the canal near to us was the last section to be built, involving high costs to reduce the environmental impact and secure habitats for wildlife. The completed canal is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year.

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Today it is a balmy +1°C, with +3°C  forecast by the weekend. Still cold at night though, so it will take a while before we see boats coming this way again. In the meantime it is pleasantly quiet…

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Have you seen local waterways freeze this winter?

Stay safe and warm everyone!

The Tuesday View in January

As promised, here is a picture of the Tuesday View under the snow!

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It is very frosty, so I didn’t stay out for long with my camera. But here are a couple of other images from today too.

Clematis tangutica – a tangle of stems with straggly seed heads, but the snow makes them seem quite comical!

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My beautiful Miscanthus ‘Adagio’ still looks pretty with some sun catching the top…

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There is no warmth in the sun outdoors today, but it does add some welcome sparkle…

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Hope you have blue skies this week, wherever you are!

The Tuesday View: 6th September 2016

Well, there have been a few changes to my Tuesday view since last time, two weeks ago. The garden held up well to the heat at the end of August and has been enjoying a little respite over the past few days, with cooler temperatures and quite a bit of rain.

TuesdayView6th1 The main change is that the Sedums are now open, contrasting nicely with the grasses and fern, which is now turning golden…

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…and my pink rose Gertrude Jekyll has finally produced more than just one flower at a time after barely flowering at all earlier in the year. I like the effect next to the Succisella.

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The Gaura lindheimeri  (‘Summer Breeze’) at the top of the rockery has also filled out well and is producing lots more lovely pale pink/white flowers. I think the name so appropriate as it sways gently in the slightest puff of wind, even on a very hot day, making me believe there is a cool breeze!  Gaura is not always hardy in our climate, but this one seems to have got established, with its roots nicely protected under the Golden Euonymus.

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The other Euonymus, which I planted last year (a dwarf Euonymus alatus), has started to turn a lovely shade of pinky red and orange… last year it dropped all its leaves in the summer in the stress of drought and extreme heat, so I am pleased it has got established now. It is hiding below the Perovskia from this angle…

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If you would like to join me in following one view of your garden week by week to observe the changes as the year progresses, please leave a link below.

🙂

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The Tuesday View: 19th July 2016

The strong morning light gives the rockery a different feel, and although the colours are not as intense as later in the day, I feel I must record this too. So today an image from around 9.30am…

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The Perovskia is getting bluer and stragglier by the day – I do love the way it stretches out in all directions, unaware of any need to behave and tidy itself up a bit – exactly how I want it to be!

You may just be able to spot a splash of orange at the top of the rockery, dead centre (click on the photo to enlarge and zoom in)… my Crocosmia is starting to flower and it is wonderful! I will have to take more photos in a week or so, but here is an image of it taken from the top of the rockery, with the Perovskia in the background…

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The Geranium sanguineum, near the bottom, is attracting bees for breakfast…

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And the dark Day Lily, hiding at the bottom of the photo behind a Buxus, is enjoying the last few moments of shade before the sun reaches it too…

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On the right, in front of the Golden Euonymus, the gorgeous Persicaria/Polygonum amplexicaule is flowering. I love the pale foliage of this one, ‘Firetail’, and the flowers are often still standing in November!

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That is my view today, on a hot sunny July morning. Do join me in sharing one single view of your garden each week, to record the changes it sees through the seasons.