The Tuesday View: 21st November 2017 Looking Back (Take Two!)

(Due to a technical hitch I am posting this again, hence the “Take Two”!)

Since little has changed recently in my early winter garden, and since it is pouring with rain right now, kthis week my Tuesday View is a review of the year to remind myself of how this part of the rockery develops. In fact, this was the whole point of posting photos each week; to follow progress and spot gaps or particularly successful or not so successful planting combinations. I have also been able to see how various plants cope with the conditions they face throughout the seasons in this stony bed.

I started posting photos of this view in April… doesn’t that seem like a long time ago now!

And isn’t that spring sunshine lovely? (Sigh… we are stuck in the damp fog of November right now!)

Within just two weeks the view had been transformed, with the Acer and other trees in the background leafing out and the Viburnum ‘Aurora’ in full flower… it smelt gorgeous!

From then on progress was rapid: here is a gallery of May, and you can click on any picture to see a slideshow…

June brought the Lysimachia into flower, which eventually meant changing the angle I took my photos. It was a very dry month too, but fortunately ended with several days of showers.

In early July the garden managed to recover from the long drought and was surprisingly lush for the time of year! I was very impressed with the Teucrium and Hypericum standing up to the heat, and glad to see my pink Potentilla finally flower well.

The following month was hot and very humid, and it was hard to believe it was August considering how green everything was; usually the grass is brown, and the rockery is looking frazzled. But the moisture kept everything looking fresh and healthy.

September is a beautiful time of year. It is when I breathe out and enjoy the garden most of all… the heat is over and I no longer need worry that things may burn or dry out. The rockery was still very green and I think the Teucrium – which spread throughout the bed – contributed to retaining moisture. The grasses also started looking good. My favourite season…

The Acer never fails to put on a good show in October, and the asters flowered intensely too, some right through into November. By the end of the month I could finally return to my original spot to take the photos, as a lot of plants were cut down or died back.

To sum up my thoughts: it is pleasing to see that for seven or eight months of the year the rockery has been attractive from various angles and hardly any plants suffered seriously from the heat. A couple of spots need attention, and fighting the ground elder in spring is always a problem, but overall I am a satisfied gardener!

I wonder how you feel about your gardening year. Were there any particular highlights – good or bad? Have you been able to pinpoint problem areas or gain inspiration from successful planting?

The Tuesday View posts have, for me, served their purpose. So I will not continue with them over winter. But I do hope all those who have joined me over the past months will continue sharing their views as long as they can.

Thanks to you all!

PS Here is Christina’s post this week: https://myhesperidesgarden.wordpress.com/2017/11/21/tuesday-view-21st-november-2017/

 

The Tuesday View: 21st November 2017 – Looking Back

Since little has changed recently in my early winter garden, and since it is pouring with rain right now, kthis week my Tuesday View is a review of the year to remind myself of how this part of the rockery develops. In fact, this was the whole point of posting photos each week; to follow progress and spot gaps or particularly successful or not so successful planting combinations. I have also been able to see how various plants cope with the conditions they face throughout the seasons in this stony bed.

I started posting photos of this view in April… doesn’t that seem like a long time ago now!

And isn’t that spring sunshine lovely? (Sigh… we are stuck in the damp fog of November right now!)

Within just two weeks the view had been transformed, with the Acer and other trees in the background leafing out and the Viburnum ‘Aurora’ in full flower… it smelt gorgeous!

From then on progress was rapid: here is a gallery of May, and you can click on any picture to see a slideshow…

June brought the Lysimachia into flower, which eventually meant changing the angle I took my photos. It was a very dry month too, but fortunately ended with several days of showers.

In early July the garden managed to recover from the long drought and was surprisingly lush for the time of year! I was very impressed with the Teucrium and Hypericum standing up to the heat, and glad to see my pink Potentilla finally flower well.

The following month was hot and very humid, and it was hard to believe it was August considering how green everything was; usually the grass is brown, and the rockery is looking frazzled. But the moisture kept everything looking fresh and healthy.

September is a beautiful time of year. It is when I breathe out and enjoy the garden most of all… the heat is over and I no longer need worry that things may burn or dry out. The rockery was still very green and I think the Teucrium – which spread throughout the bed – contributed to retaining moisture. The grasses also started looking good. My favourite season…

The Acer never fails to put on a good show in October, and the asters flowered intensely too, some right through into November. By the end of the month I could finally return to my original spot to take the photos, as a lot of plants were cut down or died back.

To sum up my thoughts: it is pleasing to see that for seven or eight months of the year the rockery has been attractive from various angles and hardly any plants suffered seriously from the heat. A couple of spots need attention, and fighting the ground elder in spring is always a problem, but overall I am a satisfied gardener!

I wonder how you feel about your gardening year. Were there any particular highlights – good or bad? Have you been able to pinpoint problem areas or gain inspiration from successful planting?

The Tuesday View posts have, for me, served their purpose. So I will not continue with them over winter. But I do hope all those who have joined me over the past months will continue sharing their views as long as they can.

Thanks to you all!

 

The Tuesday View: 13th June 2017

It was a lovely sunny day today, with a cool breeze, and I actually enjoyed my least favourite garden/household chore – tidying the front hedge and sweeping the drive. I much prefer being in the back garden though. And looking at this view!

The lavender in the foreground is now flowering and the Lysimachia and Golden Rod (which will probably flower early this year) have got so tall. But let’s zoom in to that fluffy white blob in the distance, just to the left of the Acer…

The Goats’ Beard is flowering! And with the strong  breezes we have had, that and the giant Miscanthus left of it have been rustling and swaying like mad.

If I walk a few steps down the path I can show you the view from a slightly different angle – the pink rose at the top of this part of the rockery is now flowering too.

Here is a closer shot…

No name I’m afraid. It was here when we came, albeit rather neglected. It flowers on and off all summer.

Finally a longer shot. If you saw my vase yesterday you will see why I made the choice to use Lysimachia and Alchemilla together. 😉

If you would like to join me with a regular view of one part of your garden, please do!

🙂

 

The Tuesday View: 6th June 2017

It’s raining! 😀

We have had light rainshowers on and off all day. Not really enough, but better than nothing! (Update: 3 hours later – those gentle showers have turned into very heavy rain. Yippee!)

Perfect weather for showing my Tuesday View as my garden suddenly looks green again.

In the foreground the Lavender is showing a tinge of colour before it opens. And on the right the tall blue Campanula persicifolia are now open too, while the hardy Geraniums continue to provide splashes of various shades of pink.

The yellow Lysimachia is in full flower. Doesn’t she look harmless?…

The Clematis tangutica ‘Orange Peel’ on the (far too small) obelisk is also in flower…

But my favourite colour here at the moment is this pretty Geranium (I think it is G.’Rozanne’) among some Stipa gigantea; next to the red poppies it stands out even more…

Looking down to the left, at the front of this view, is the lovely Melica ciliata, which I have also seen growing wild on one of our walks nearby.

I pulled loads of the Lysimachia out just a few weeks ago… I could have removed a bit more, but it is lovely while flowering!

As spring progresses into summer, focusing on a particular area of the garden is so useful to me. Why not join in! Just leave a comment below with a link to your view this Tuesday.

Have a great gardening week!

The Nepal Himalaya Park

Last week we had a bank holiday here in Bavaria – Ascension Day. This meant that an ideal spot for meeting up with friends would be open… the Nepal Himalaya Park near Regensburg.

I have never visited a garden in Germany that captivated me quite like this one! It is most certainly not a traditional ‘show garden’, where plants are placed for effect and labelled with care. No, this was more of a plant fanatic’s paradise, a playground for the owner of the park to see what he can grow, with a mostly oriental theme; a little chaotic, quite wild in places, but absolutely charming in my eyes!

The Nepal Himalaya Pavillon

Photo from the Pavillon website: http://www.nepal-himalaya-pavillon.de

The garden is set into a south-facing hillside in part of a former quarry, and the main ‘attraction’ which inspired it is the Himalaya Pavillon. This temple was actually the Nepalese exhibit at the Expo 2000 in Hanover. It was painstakingly dismantled and rebuilt here in its new home. The garden then arose around it a few years later, so is still relatively young.

My photos are not brilliant as I used my mobile phone, but I think you can get the idea of what the temple looks like surrounded by enormous trees, rhododendrons and azaleas.

I was so pleasantly surprised when I walked through the gate, as it was not at all what I had expected. Along with the traditional perennials, native wild flowers and many herbs there were a lot of unusual plants unknown to me, which I had to look up when I got home. So if you see I have made a mistake, please feel free to correct me!

Only recently I had looked up Amsonia, when Jason from Garden in a City mentioned them. Then there they were – the first flower I laid my eyes on and the first time I had seen one.

Amsonia illustris

I found the foliage particularly striking.

As we walked down a slope past a pond, I noticed Anthericum everywhere, along with patches of blue Corydalis and various Euphorbias.

This plant kept popping up too… I believe it is a type of Echium, although I personally only know the blue sort that grows by the roadsides here.

Echium amoenum

The Japanese garden didn’t do much for me, but as we passed that we came to a shadier area where hostas and ferns were thriving…

I wonder if anyone can tell me what the tall plant is between the yellow irises and poppies… It looks kind of familiar.

Along the way there were small temples, bells and a prayer wheel – all original pieces shipped from Nepal. But I was focussed on the plants!

Lilac

The newest part of the garden is the Chinese Garden – it is very wild, overrun with native wild flowers, but still managing to make quite an impact with the wooden bridges and gateways placed at intervals and the setting itself in the rockiest part of the old quarry is fairly dramatic…

Finally, the plant of the day: Lupins!

On our way home we noticed blue ones growing by the roadsides – something we don’t see in our valley at home.

The website is unfortunately all in German, but there is a virtual tour of the garden here, navigable without any language.

And should you ever visit this part of the world, I would definitely recommend this to serious plant lovers! What kind of gardens do you like to visit best – wild and weedy or formal and tidy? 😉

In a Vase on Monday: Centre Piece

It is very hot again this Monday, probably hitting 30°C later, so any flowers I want to enjoy before they wilt are coming indoors! My Centaurea succumbs to blackfly and then mildew almost every year, so I picked a single perfect flower that had just opened, and together with some Centranthus ruber that is just opening it is the central focus in this week’s vase.

The feathery petals are echoed by the fluffy spidery Pulsatilla seed heads which I always like to use in vases…

And for contrast the lovely Alchemilla mollis..,

The bluest of blue skies in the background made me wonder if this Centaurea really is blue, or perhaps slightly mauve?

I hope you also have blue skies today.

A couple of Hosta leaves were added, to be appreciated before the snails discover them. 😉 And a single stem of young birch.

Thanks, as always, go to Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for hosting this meme. She has a stunning rose to share this week.

 Happy gardening!