The Tuesday View: 21st November 2017 Looking Back (Take Two!)

(Due to a technical hitch I am posting this again, hence the “Take Two”!)

Since little has changed recently in my early winter garden, and since it is pouring with rain right now, kthis week my Tuesday View is a review of the year to remind myself of how this part of the rockery develops. In fact, this was the whole point of posting photos each week; to follow progress and spot gaps or particularly successful or not so successful planting combinations. I have also been able to see how various plants cope with the conditions they face throughout the seasons in this stony bed.

I started posting photos of this view in April… doesn’t that seem like a long time ago now!

And isn’t that spring sunshine lovely? (Sigh… we are stuck in the damp fog of November right now!)

Within just two weeks the view had been transformed, with the Acer and other trees in the background leafing out and the Viburnum ‘Aurora’ in full flower… it smelt gorgeous!

From then on progress was rapid: here is a gallery of May, and you can click on any picture to see a slideshow…

June brought the Lysimachia into flower, which eventually meant changing the angle I took my photos. It was a very dry month too, but fortunately ended with several days of showers.

In early July the garden managed to recover from the long drought and was surprisingly lush for the time of year! I was very impressed with the Teucrium and Hypericum standing up to the heat, and glad to see my pink Potentilla finally flower well.

The following month was hot and very humid, and it was hard to believe it was August considering how green everything was; usually the grass is brown, and the rockery is looking frazzled. But the moisture kept everything looking fresh and healthy.

September is a beautiful time of year. It is when I breathe out and enjoy the garden most of all… the heat is over and I no longer need worry that things may burn or dry out. The rockery was still very green and I think the Teucrium – which spread throughout the bed – contributed to retaining moisture. The grasses also started looking good. My favourite season…

The Acer never fails to put on a good show in October, and the asters flowered intensely too, some right through into November. By the end of the month I could finally return to my original spot to take the photos, as a lot of plants were cut down or died back.

To sum up my thoughts: it is pleasing to see that for seven or eight months of the year the rockery has been attractive from various angles and hardly any plants suffered seriously from the heat. A couple of spots need attention, and fighting the ground elder in spring is always a problem, but overall I am a satisfied gardener!

I wonder how you feel about your gardening year. Were there any particular highlights – good or bad? Have you been able to pinpoint problem areas or gain inspiration from successful planting?

The Tuesday View posts have, for me, served their purpose. So I will not continue with them over winter. But I do hope all those who have joined me over the past months will continue sharing their views as long as they can.

Thanks to you all!

PS Here is Christina’s post this week: https://myhesperidesgarden.wordpress.com/2017/11/21/tuesday-view-21st-november-2017/

 

The Tuesday View: 21st November 2017 – Looking Back

Since little has changed recently in my early winter garden, and since it is pouring with rain right now, kthis week my Tuesday View is a review of the year to remind myself of how this part of the rockery develops. In fact, this was the whole point of posting photos each week; to follow progress and spot gaps or particularly successful or not so successful planting combinations. I have also been able to see how various plants cope with the conditions they face throughout the seasons in this stony bed.

I started posting photos of this view in April… doesn’t that seem like a long time ago now!

And isn’t that spring sunshine lovely? (Sigh… we are stuck in the damp fog of November right now!)

Within just two weeks the view had been transformed, with the Acer and other trees in the background leafing out and the Viburnum ‘Aurora’ in full flower… it smelt gorgeous!

From then on progress was rapid: here is a gallery of May, and you can click on any picture to see a slideshow…

June brought the Lysimachia into flower, which eventually meant changing the angle I took my photos. It was a very dry month too, but fortunately ended with several days of showers.

In early July the garden managed to recover from the long drought and was surprisingly lush for the time of year! I was very impressed with the Teucrium and Hypericum standing up to the heat, and glad to see my pink Potentilla finally flower well.

The following month was hot and very humid, and it was hard to believe it was August considering how green everything was; usually the grass is brown, and the rockery is looking frazzled. But the moisture kept everything looking fresh and healthy.

September is a beautiful time of year. It is when I breathe out and enjoy the garden most of all… the heat is over and I no longer need worry that things may burn or dry out. The rockery was still very green and I think the Teucrium – which spread throughout the bed – contributed to retaining moisture. The grasses also started looking good. My favourite season…

The Acer never fails to put on a good show in October, and the asters flowered intensely too, some right through into November. By the end of the month I could finally return to my original spot to take the photos, as a lot of plants were cut down or died back.

To sum up my thoughts: it is pleasing to see that for seven or eight months of the year the rockery has been attractive from various angles and hardly any plants suffered seriously from the heat. A couple of spots need attention, and fighting the ground elder in spring is always a problem, but overall I am a satisfied gardener!

I wonder how you feel about your gardening year. Were there any particular highlights – good or bad? Have you been able to pinpoint problem areas or gain inspiration from successful planting?

The Tuesday View posts have, for me, served their purpose. So I will not continue with them over winter. But I do hope all those who have joined me over the past months will continue sharing their views as long as they can.

Thanks to you all!

 

The Tuesday View: 12th September 2017

The sun came out this afternon after a damp morning, so I was glad I had waited in hope and could take some photos of the Tuesday view in bright sunshine with raindrops glistening everywhere.

The shot above was actually taken whilst balancing on the rock I place my birdbath on, with the pink rose at my feet producing more buds again. If I zoom in we can see the Aster more clearly with the Hypericum and Helianthus behind it.

The next photo is a few steps further to the right, looking down towards the giant Miscanthus at the bottom of the rockery…

Now I have taken a few steps back and am looking towards the pathway that goes down the side of the garden. You can see what a tangle the lovely Clematis tangutica becomes on this large-but-not-large-enough obelisk. I can also detect noticeable brownish-orange tinges to the Acer.

And as we walk down the path and look left, between the Clematis and the Acer we can see my beloved dwarf Miscanthus ‘Adagio’ in front of the giant Miscanthus. Teucrium, Sedum, Perovskia and yellow Potentilla complete the picture.

I wonder what pleasures your garden is bringing as the seasons change. If you would like to join me in posting a view of one part of your garden each week, just leave a link below in the comments so that we can find you.

🙂

Have a lovely week!

 

In a Vase on Monday: Late Summer Lusciousness

That blue sky in the first picture below sadly didn’t last beyond midday, but was welcome after a chilly week with plenty of rain and drearier skies. Summer has definitely left, as have most of the swallows, but the garden is still looking quite summery and is clearly reluctant to stop producing lovely flowers. So I am again joining Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for her Monday meme. 😀

I started off with my Tree of Life vase, which I really wanted to use as the seasons change, and I was intent on filling it! The Cosmos have been lovely these past few weeks, so I picked some of the pale pink ones along with a couple of ‘Picotee’ and ‘Cranberry Double Click’. Pink seems to be the main colour right now, with the small rose flowering once again and the Sedums blushing beautifully. A few went in the vase, along with a couple of the deeper pink Japanese Anemones (‘Serenade’) and some of the various Scabiosa grown in pots this summer. But then this golden Helianthus was shining so brightly I couldn’t resist adding it too. I think it makes the golden centres of the Anemones stand out even better.

The first of these tiny violet Asters are flowering and a sprig actually got trimmed by mistake, so I added that too…

A few white Scabiosa and some of the lovely white Verbena grown as an annual added a few lighter highlights to the arrangement.

I included some of that wonderful Teucrium that has been flowering for months and at this time of year threatens to take over the whole rockery. (Great chunks will be uprooted in winter!)

And of course I just had to use some grasses as well – Miscanthus and Pennisetum.

As autumn apporaches, or spring in the southern hemisphere, do visit Cathy to see what fellow gardeners around the globe are finding to put in their vases this Monday!

The Best Pesto I Have Ever Eaten!

The title of this post refers to the compliment I received from friends who are not vegan, when I served up our homemade vegan basil pesto for dinner recently. I was chuffed, and my Man of Many Talents thought it was time I shared my secret recipe. So here it is!

Vegan Basil Pesto

For 4-6 servings:

  • 3 cups/45 g fresh basil leaves (homegrown is best! 😉 )
  • 90 g pine nuts (they are expensive, but splash out on the best quality you can find)
  • 15 g cashews
  • 4 level tbsps nutritious yeast (essential for texture and the slight ‘cheesy’ flavour)
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic (fresh if possible)
  • 3 sun-dried tomatoes (the sort that come in a jar, marinated in oil), roughly chopped
  • 1 – 2 tbsps of the sun-dried tomato oil
  • 100 ml of mild olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Mix all the ingredients in a mixer until chunky. If the mixture is too thick you can either add a drop more oil or – if it is being eaten the same day – a splash of water to thin it slightly.

Serve over hot pasta and let all that sunshiny flavour tickle your tastebuds! Very good with a tomato salad and a cold drink. 🙂

Do you love basil too? What sorts do you grow and what do you use it for?

The Tuesday View: 5th September 2017

Thanks to those who posted a Tuesday View last week in my absence. I spent a few days in the UK and enjoyed some fabulous weather over the bank holiday weekend in my Mum’s pretty garden. 🙂

After just a short time away from my own garden I can now see some real change. The view is somewhat disshevelled after some more really hot days took their toll, some real downpours flattened the Perovskia (again!) and now cooler nights are leading to foliage colour fading to yellow. Leaves are beginning to litter the beds and lawn. Yes, autumn is on its way.

What has struck me most this week though is the change in light. On a bright sunny Monday afternoon bursts of sunshine were interrupted with a few moody clouds… Here are a few photos in a slide show, so you can see what I mean.

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Have you noticed the changing season yet? Do share a view if you can, and visit those who are linking in below!

Next week I should have got round to tidying up a bit and hope to show a few close-ups. 😉

Have a wonderful week!